Anti-abortion resources

If you or someone you know is facing an unplanned pregnancy, don’t despair. There are resources. There are people who will do anything to help you choose life for your child.

Before considering abortion, please watch this video of an abortion being performed on an 11-week-old. You can fast-forward to about 3 minutes and 33 seconds to watch just the ultrasound.

Wherever you are, there are crisis pregnancy centers that offer services to help you navigate your pregnancy and support you in preparing to parent or place your child for adoption. Just Google “crisis pregnancy center” and your town. If you want help finding a CPC or would just like someone to talk to, please contact me. I am more than willing and happy to help you make the right decision.

A baby’s heart begins to beat at about 24 days (3 weeks) after conception. Every abortion stops a beating heart. Visit this link to see week-by-week videos of how your baby is growing.

If you have had an abortion and now think you may be experiencing Post Abortion Syndrome, please follow this link to learn about hope and healing. Local CPCs may be able to point you toward local help as well. And of course, feel welcome to contact me.

Every adult should be informed about what abortion really is. Please do not support abortion out of party loyalty or because you want to be non-judgmental. One in three pregnancies end in abortion in this country. Please consider talking to your church about developing a pro-life presence in your town! Below you will find a description of the abortion techniques and what takes place.

Surgical abortion

This procedure involves the use of a mechanical device (suction or vacuum aspirator), surgical instruments (forceps, sharp curette and cervical dilators) and/or long needles (for injecting a deadly concentration of saline or digoxin) in order to end the life of a preborn child. Surgical abortions are performed on children at any stage of their human development (1st through 3rd trimesters). The specific technique selected depends upon the child’s gestational age.

First Trimester- procedures performed up to 14 weeks 
  Surgical abortions are not generally performed until 6 weeks after the woman’s last menstrual period. By this time, the baby has a brain, spinal cord, head and body and a heart pumping blood throughout their body. Arms and legs are growing. By 8 weeks, all internal organs are formed, and spinal circuitry for pain detection is established, enabling the baby to react to pain. By 10 weeks, the child has 90% of all the body parts he or she will ever have. The baby yawns, stretches, sighs and sucks their thumb by 11 weeks. They respond to light touch by recoiling.

  • Suction Aspiration
  • Dilation and Curettage (D&C)

Second Trimester- procedures performed between 12 and 24 weeks (3-6 months)
  By 13 weeks, the child can make complex facial expressions. Gender differences emerge at 16 weeks and the mother may begin to feel her baby move inside her womb. Stress hormones are released in response to pain by 18 weeks. Preborn children have been observed crying by 20 weeks and can survive outside the womb after this point. 

  • Dilation and Evacuation (D&E)
  • Induction Abortion

Third Trimester- procedures performed from 20 weeks (5 months) up to full term
  From 20 weeks on, the preborn child is no different than the child born prematurely. Rapid eye movement (dreaming) is observed in preborn infants of 20-23 weeks. They can hear by 18 weeks and show a startle response to loud noises by 26 weeks. Lungs mature and sight and smell develop during this time. 

  • Dilation and Extraction (D&X)
  • Induction Abortion

Suction or Vacuum Aspiration Technique
  Suction Aspiration is the most common 1st trimester technique. It is used to kill a child up to 12 weeks from conception. 
   Procedure Description

  •     The mother lies on her back with her feet in stirrups.
  •     The cervix is cleaned.
  •     Local cervical pain killer may be given.
  •     A clamp (tenaculum) is placed on part of the cervix.
  •     A dilator, or several sized dilators at varying widths, is used to open the cervix wide enough for the suction to fit inside.
  •     The abortionist guides the tube inside the uterus and turns on the suction machine.
  •     The placenta as well as the child’s head, limbs and organs are removed in pieces small enough to fit through the suction tubing and into a container.
  •     The nurse (or assistant) reassembles the child, making certain that all of the baby pieces have been suctioned from the uterus.

    Complications or side effects
 Since most abortions are not guided by ultrasound, the abortionist cannot see inside the uterus. He or she uses the top of the suction tube as a means of sensing (feeling) how much of the uterine lining has been removed with the placenta and the child. Major complications can occur in about 1% of women having a surgical abortion. These may include:

    Persistent or Excessive Bleeding

  • Abnormal bleeding may result from many factors. the most common being retained products of conception (RPOC). This is where the abortion fails to extract all pregnancy tissue from the uterus. At times, this can and does include leaving some baby pieces left inside the mother. This causes continuous and at time excessive bleeding. Other reasons for abnormal bleeding after an abortion include: uterine muscles not contracting or blood vessels not constricting to stop the bleeding. Also blood clots may develop inside the uterus after the procedure. The woman will need repeat suction and medication to stop the bleeding.
  • The uterus and/or intestine may have been perforated (a wall punched through with the suction tube or other instrument inserted within the uterus). On occasion, with hemorrhaging, a woman may require abdominal surgery and/or a blood transfusion to replace large blood losses.
  • The cervix may be lacerated (cut or torn), requiring suture repair in order to stop significant bleeding.

    Failed Abortion

  • Sometimes, when this procedure is performed during the earliest stages of human development, the suction device may miss the child. In such cases, the pregnancy continues. A sonogram is performed to locate the child for repeat suction.

Dilation and Curettage (D&C) Technique
  Dilation and Curettage abortion technique is used to kill a child up to 12 weeks after conception, or when there are complications resulting from other procedures (such as an incomplete abortion, a failed abortion or retained components of the pregnancy [RPOC] after suction). This technique is also used following a miscarriage.
    Procedure Description

  • The mother lies on her back with feet in stirrups.
  • The cervix may be dilated mechanically or with medication before the procedure (if the child is older than 12 weeks). Otherwise, it is dilated during the procedure.
  • The cervix is cleaned and a local pain killer may be given.
  • A clamp (tentaculum) is attached to part of the cervix.
  • Once the cervix is dilated, a curette (a steel loop-shaped surgical knife) is used to scrape out the placenta and the child. This scraping process is called “curettage”. 

   Complications or Side Effects
  Since most abortions are not guided by ultrasound, the abortionist cannot see inside the uterus. He or she uses the top of the suction tube as a means of sensing (feeling) how much of the uterine lining has been removed with the placenta and the baby. Major complications can occur in about 1% of women having a surgical abortion. These may include:

    Infection
  Remaining parts of the child or an undiagnosed STD may cause an infection requiring outpatient pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) treatment, or hospitalization for intravenous antibiotics. If human parts are retained after an aspiration procedure, the woman may need another aspiration procedure in addition to repeat curettage. 

    Persistent or Excessive Bleeding

  • Abnormal bleeding may result from many factors. the most common being retained products of conception (RPOC). This is where the abortion fails to extract all pregnancy tissue from the uterus. At times, this can and does include leaving some baby pieces left inside the mother. This causes continuous and at time excessive bleeding. Other reasons for abnormal bleeding after an abortion include: uterine muscles not contracting or blood vessels not constricting to stop the bleeding. Also, blood clots may develop inside the uterus after the procedure. The woman will need repeat suction and medication to stop bleeding.
  • The uterus and/or intestine may have been perforated (a wall punched through by the instrument inserted within the uterus). On occasion, with hemorrhaging, a woman may require a blood transfusion to replace large blood losses and/or additional abdominal surgery to repair the damage.
  • The cervix may be lacerated (cut or torn), requiring suture repair in order to stop significant bleeding. 

    Failed Abortion
  Sometimes, when this procedure is performed during the earliest stages of human development, the instruments may miss the child. In such cases, the pregnancy continues. A sonogram is performed to locate the child for repeat suction and D&C (if there is no ectopic pregnancy). 

Dilation and Evacuation (D&E) Technique
  Dilation and Evacuation is the most common surgical technique used in the 2nd trimester. Generally, it is performed when the child is between 12-24 weeks old. 
NOTE: Because the child is bigger at this stage and bone calcification has occurred, forceps are used to crush the bones of the baby and empty the uterus. The cervix must be opened wider (than that required in a D&C or Suction Aspiration) to allow entry of forceps. The term “forceps” refers to the surgical instrument resembling pliers with sharp teeth used to grab and pull out body parts/tissue. Intravenous sedation or general anesthesia may be required.

    Procedure Description Method 1 (May require a minimum of 2 visits)

  • While at the clinic, laminaria (rods made of seaweed) are inserted into the cervix, causing dilation.
  • The mother goes home and returns the next day.
  • After returning to the clinic, she lies on her back with feet in stirrups.
  • The laminaria are removed and the size of the cervical opening is evaluated. 
  • The cervix is cleaned; a clamp is attached to part of it.
  • If the cervical opening is wide enough for forceps to enter, the process of grabbing, crushing and tearing away the child’s body parts begins. 
  • After the procedure, the child’s parts are reassembled to insure that all pieces have been removed.
  • A final curettage may be performed. 

    Method 2 (The entire procedure is done during a single clinic visit)

  • Laminaria is inserted inside the cervix to cause it to dilate.
  • If, after a given period of time, the cervix is not open wide enough, it is stretched to allow forceps inside the uterus.
  • The procedure continues according to protocol until all the child’s body parts are removed from the uterus.
  • A final curettage may be performed. 

  Complications or Side Effects
  During this procedure, the doctor cannot see inside the uterus. He or she may use an instrument to evaluate the depth of the uterus. Also, the risk of major complications is higher in 2nd trimester abortions than in 1st trimester abortions. These complications may result from the uterine wall being thinner, more blood vessels are present and the child is bigger. 

    Complications May Include

    Infection
  Remaining parts of the child or an undiagnosed STD may cause an infection requiring outpatient PID treatment or hospitalization for intravenous antibiotics. If human parts are retained, the woman will need another curettage procedure.

     Persistent or Excessive Bleeding

  • Abnormal bleeding may result from uterine muscles not contracting or blood vessels not constricting to stop the bleeding. Also, blood clots may develop inside the uterus after the procedure. The woman will need repeat suction and medication to stop bleeding.
  • The uterus and/or intestine may have been perforated (a wall punched through by the instrument inserted within the uterus). The uterine wall is much thinner in the 2nd trimester. On occasion, the hemorrhaging is severe enough to require a blood transfusion and abdominal surgery.
  • The cervix may be lacerated (cut or torn), requiring suture repair in order to stop significant bleeding. 

    Cervical Incompetence
  A mother may not be able to carry a future pregnancy to term as a result of injuries to the cervix during a 2nd trimester abortion. Stretching, scarring, or any other damage to the cervix weakness it and its ability to stay closed. This increases the likelihood future babies from being miscarried or born premature.

Induction Abortion (Instillation or Poisoning) Technique
  Injection of a toxic chemical (saline, digoxin, potassium chloride or urea, either directly into the bay’s heart or into the amniotic fluid, depend on what type of poison is being used) followed by medically induced labor is performed when a child is 16 weeks old and beyond (when enough amniotic fluid is present to surround the baby).
NOTE: This procedure may require hospitalization

    Procedure Description

  • A long needle is inserted through the mother’s abdomen (belly) into the amniotic sac.
  • If the poison will be injected into the amniotic sac, the amniotic fluid protecting the child may be suctioned out. 
  • The abortionist injects the toxic chemical either into the amniotic sac or directly into the heart or head of the baby to kill them. By the fourth month, the child has been drinking and breathing in amniotic fluid to help the organs develop properly. However, when the salt solution or other poison is substituted for the normal amniotic fluid, it causes severe burning of the childʼs skin, eyes, mouth and lungs. 
  • The cervix is packed with laminaria (rods made of seaweed) to cause it to dilate. Depending how much dilation is required, the laminaria may be left in the patient for up to 2 days.
  • Labor may begin without medication within 24 hours of the injection, resulting in the delivery of a dead child. In the case of salt poisoning, the child is shriveled and badly burned.
  • If miscarriage does not occur spontaneously, medications are given to cause the uterus to contract and expel the child (induced labor).

   Complications or Side Effects
  Delivery of a badly burned child. The child may survive this procedure and be
delivered alive. But, may not live for a very long time thereafter. Risks to the mother include:

  • Accidentally injecting the poison into the mother’s bloodstream.
  • Possible damage to the uterus during the injection procedure.
  • Infection.
  • Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage).
  • Excessive uterine contractions and pain.
  • Rupture of a scar from a previous uterine surgery (such as Cesarean Section).

    Future Infertility Problems
  The woman may have future infertility problems if the uterus has been badly scarred during this procedure. Risk of miscarriage and premature birth is increased.

Partial Birth Abortion (D&X) Technique
  This technique is approved for use in mothers with Preborn children 20 weeks old and beyond. Although a federal ban on “Partial Birth Abortion” was enacted in 2003, the narrow legal definition of the procedure combined with state laws allow this and similar procedures to continue in certain cases.
    Procedure Description
  General anesthesia may be required to complete this procedure. 

    Days 1 and 2

  • Laminaria (rods made of seaweed) are inserted into the cervix and left in place for up to 2 days

    Day 3

  • Ultrasound is used to locate the child’s legs.
  • The abortionist uses large forceps (sopher clamp) to grab each leg and pull them through the cervix and down into the vagina.
  • The remainder of the body, except the head, is pulled through the cervical opening.
  • The head remains inside the uterus.
  • the abortionist makes an incision (cut) at the base of the skull and inserts a catheter (tube) to suck out the brain, causing the skull to collapse.
  • The dead body is then removed completely from the uterus.

Complications or Side Effects
  When this procedure is used on full term sized infants, it is in effect, intentionally rearranging the child in utero position from head down to feet and legs down for a breech delivery.

    Infection

  •  Remaining parts of the child or an undiagnosed STD may cause an infection, as well as or other post-procedure complications that require treatment including intravenous antibiotics. If human parts are retained, the woman will need another procedure to remove fragments.

    Persistent or excessive bleeding

  • Abnormal bleeding may result from uterine muscles not contracting or blood vessels not constricting to stop the bleeding. Also, blood clots may develop inside the uterus after the procedure. The woman may need another procedure and/or medication to stop bleeding.
  • The uterus and/or intestine may have been lacerated or perforated (a hole punched through the wall by instruments inserted within the uterus). The walls of the uterus are at its thinnest in 3rd trimester.
  • On occasion, the hemorrhaging is severe enough to require a blood transfusion.
  • The cervix may be lacerated (cut or torn) requiring suture repair in order to stop significant bleeding.

    Cervical Incompetence

  • A woman may not be able to carry a future pregnancy to full term as a result of injuries to the cervix (excessive stretching and tearing) following this procedure. Risk of miscarriage and premature birth are increased. 
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2 Responses to “Anti-abortion resources”

  1. Jason B. Ladd October 10, 2013 at 10:22 pm #

    This is information everyone should see.

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